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Repeat hygiene offender banned

Tom Wall11/11/2015 - 13:42

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A dead rat was found in the takeaway in 2013
A dead rat was found in the takeaway in 2013

A takeaway manager has been banned from running a food business after EHOs found he flouted hygiene laws in his kebab shop.

Nisar Ahmed was banned indefinitely last month after admitting eight offences in North Staffordshire Justice Centre. He was fined £4,500 and ordered to pay £1,332 costs.

The officers found that found a dirty microwave, fridge and dough mixer at Dr Food, in Church Street, Stoke, in 2014.

In 2013 Mr Ahmed, who lives above the takeaway, was given a 12-month community order for 10 food hygiene offences after a dead rat was found in his takeaway.

But when EHOs returned in June 2014 they found widespread dirt in the preparation and storage areas. Food preparation equipment not been cleaned when they visited again in December 2014.

The court heard that Mr Ahmed claimed the takeaway was closed when EHOs visited but the front door was open and the open sign was clearly displayed.

Mr Ahmed’s lawyers said he had been finding it difficult to manage the business and had been ill at the time.

The takeaway closed in April this year.

The magistrate said it was only luck no one was harmed. ‘Although no members of the public were harmed, it was purely by luck and not of any design of Mr Ahmed. In these offences he failed to comply with the instructions received to improve his premises's hygiene and management. He was obviously open on the first visit and lied to the officers.’

Randy Conteh, cabinet member for communities, said it was clear from the evidence presented in court that Mr Ahmed did not take his responsibilities as a food business operator seriously.

‘The poor cleaning and unhygienic practices put customers at risk from food poisoning and although he was given advice and information on how to make improvements, this was not taken on board,’ he said.

‘Food poisoning has an economic effect on the city, the victims need time off work to recover and NHS resources are called upon. Indirectly, compliant businesses are disadvantaged as they commit resources to complying with the law.’

‘For these reasons, an application was made for a prohibition order against Mr Ahmed to prevent him from managing a food business in the future.’
 

Repeat hygiene offender banned

A takeaway manager has been banned from running a food business after EHOs found he flouted hygiene laws in his kebab shop.

Nisar Ahmed was banned indefinitely last month after admitting eight offences in North Staffordshire Justice Centre. He was fined £4,500 and ordered to pay £1,332 costs.

The officers found that found a dirty microwave, fridge and dough mixer at Dr Food, in Church Street, Stoke, in 2014.

In 2013 Mr Ahmed, who lives above the takeaway, was given a 12-month community order for 10 food hygiene offences after a dead rat was found in his takeaway.

But when EHOs returned in June 2014 they found widespread dirt in the preparation and storage areas. Food preparation equipment not been cleaned when they visited again in December 2014.

The court heard that Mr Ahmed claimed the takeaway was closed when EHOs visited but the front door was open and the open sign was clearly displayed.

Mr Ahmed’s lawyers said he had been finding it difficult to manage the business and had been ill at the time.

The takeaway closed in April this year.

The magistrate said it was only luck no one was harmed. ‘Although no members of the public were harmed, it was purely by luck and not of any design of Mr Ahmed. In these offences he failed to comply with the instructions received to improve his premises's hygiene and management. He was obviously open on the first visit and lied to the officers.’

Randy Conteh, cabinet member for communities, said it was clear from the evidence presented in court that Mr Ahmed did not take his responsibilities as a food business operator seriously.

‘The poor cleaning and unhygienic practices put customers at risk from food poisoning and although he was given advice and information on how to make improvements, this was not taken on board,’ he said.

‘Food poisoning has an economic effect on the city, the victims need time off work to recover and NHS resources are called upon. Indirectly, compliant businesses are disadvantaged as they commit resources to complying with the law.’

‘For these reasons, an application was made for a prohibition order against Mr Ahmed to prevent him from managing a food business in the future.’
 

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